George Papathanassiou

Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake

The M7.8 Kaikoura Earthquake in New Zealand produced one of the most complex ruptures ever observed, involving many different faults. Earthquake environmental effects include up to 10 m offset at the Kekerengu Fault, secondary ruptures, a tsunami, coseismic uplift, landslides and rockfalls, liquefaction, and maybe even earthquake lights. Lots of blogs and websites provide coverage on this earthquake, e.g. Geonet, the Landslide Blog, and The Trembling Earth. Our colleagues from the Research Group on Earthquake Geology in Greece worked on the landslides that happened during the earthquake. George Papathanassiou sent me the link to their Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake.

They used Sentinel-2 satellite images to map more than 1000 large landslides.

Landlside map by the Research Group on Earthquake Geology in Greece

Landslide map by the Research Group on Earthquake Geology in Greece

The map is available in A2 as JPG, PDF, and KMZ overlay.

Please cite the map as:

  • Valkaniotis Sotiris, Papathanassiou George, & Pavlides Spyros. (2016). Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake [Data set]. Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.167130
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Christoph Grützner

Christoph Grützner

works at the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge. He likes Central Asia and the Mediterranean and is looking for ancient earthquakes.

See all posts Christoph Grützner

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