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  • H. Hilbert-Wolf

    Paleoseismology Through Sedimentology

    The Megablock Complex: An example from the East African Rift

    Recognizing and interpreting seismite horizons (soft-sediment deformation generated by earthquakes) preserved in the sedimentary record is an underappreciated approach for paleoseismic analysis. The addition of sedimentological studies to a toolkit that includes other well-established methods, such as instrumental seismic monitoring and fault trenching, can provide a less expensive and more practical option for earthquake hazard prediction and preparation in certain areas. For example, this may be a good option in less developed regions and in areas where fault trenching may not be possible. Moreover, there is a lot that we can learn rheologically from the study of seismites that could be invaluable for modeling the behavior of the surface/near-surface during seismic activity. Similarly, investigating Quaternary strata in areas that may be prone to seismicity, which may or may not have a recorded history of major earthquakes, can illuminate important information about earthquake recurrence patterns and intervals, in much the same way as fault trenching. more

  • Geological Society of America, Structural Geology & Tectonics Division

    Meeting postponed: NSF workshop on Future Directions in Tectonics

    Some weeks ago we advertised the NSF-sponsored workshop on Future Directions in Tectonics. Yesterday, Kevin Mahan announced that the workshop will be postponed. Read the message he circulated: more

  • 1st German ShakeOut in Aachen!

    Tomorrow, 18th June 2015, we – many voluntary student helpers and staff from RWTH Aachen University and the Geoverbund ABC-J are organizing with the Einhard-Gymnasium in Aachen, with 11-14 year old pupils the FIRST German Shake Out around midday. In special lectures and lab courses we have prepared the scholars for this event, but WHAT?? is a ShakeOut?

    more

  • William HoilesCC BY 2.0

    An update on paleoseismology literature

    Here are my latest updates on papers and books that deal with paleoseismology, active tectonics, tsunamis and similar topics. There is a good portion of lake/turbidite paleoseismology with some beautiful seismites. We also have some more general tectonics/review papers, and an interesting attempt to establish a global fault database. Plus, there is an intense ongoing discussion about Kashmir and news from Napa. Enjoy!

    You feel there’s something missing? Drop me a mail!

    more

  • Brian Sherrod (USGS)public domain

    What’s up? The Friday links (82)

    Today is Friday and here are your links on human-caused earthquakes, induced aseismic slip, typesetting costs, flash flood video footage, and more!

    more

  • Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part II: Qipan gully debris flow

    It’s Friday – but instead of the Friday links I have the story of a giant post earthquake debris flow in the Wenchuan area for you. As I already announced in my last post about the field trip to the Wenchuan earthquake epicenter in frame of the International Symposium on Mega-Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters and Long Term Effects in Chengdu, China, I still wanted to blog about the Qipan gully debris flow that we also visited during the field trip. After giving you some background information I will take you on the hike with us. We will first see massive destruction in the residential area and then have a look at the debris flow deposits and some mitigation structures while climbing up the gully. Come on, let’s go! more

  • Moyan BrennCC BY 2.0

    What’s up? The Friday links (81)

    There are articles to read, videos to watch and positions to be found: paleoseismology of Chilean turbidites, lake sediments investigated near the North Anatolian Fault, indoor footage of the Gorkha Earthquake and a discussion on Elsevier’s new sharing policies. Today is Friday and here are your links!

    more

  • Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part I: Wenchuan epicenter

    In my last post I blogged about the International Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters and Long Term Effects in Chengdu, China, and now I want to report about one of the field trips that I participated after the symposium. While we spent the morning and early afternoon at the Qipan gully to look at a giant debris flow that occurred five years after the earthquake, in the afternoon we had the chance to visit the memorial site of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, which is basically the collapsed building of a middle school close to the epicenter that was left as it was after the earthquake. I want to report about this site first because it is more about the earthquake itself. In my next post I will report about the Qipan gully debris flow. more

  • ISPRA volume “Earthquake Environmental Effect for seismic hazard assessment: the ESI intensity scale and the EEE Catalogue”

    Earthquake Environmental Effects (EEE) have proven to be valuable for describing past earthquakes and their geological imprints. The ESI2007 is a relatively new intensity scale dedicated to such effects, but also integrating traditional macroseismic scales. Examples of ESI2007 intensities assigned to large earthquakes are being collected in the EEE web catalogue hosted by the ISPRA and ESI2007-related work is conducted in the framework of INQUA.

    Another milestone now has been achieved with the ISPRA volume “Earthquake Environmental Effect for seismic hazard assessment: the ESI intensity scale and the EEE Catalogue”. This book is now available online here. It contains updates on the ESI2007, examples of applications, documentation of the EEE Android App, a huge reference list and, most importantly, the ESI2007 description in ten languages: more

  • DLR

    What’s up? The Friday links (80)

    Here are some links I collected on today’s Kent Earthquake, the impossible task of earthquake prediction and some videos on Structure From Motion and Pacific tsunami propagation. Today is Friday and here are your links!

    more

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