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Earthquake-induced landslides in the Appennines – distance versus magnitude and ESI epicentral intensity

A new paper by Esposito et al. has been published in Springer’s Landslide Science and Practice that will help to better constrain intensities on the ESI scale. Landslides induced by twelve moderate to strong earthquakes events during the last 300 yrs have been analyzed. The authors calculated distance vs. magnitude and distance vs. ESI epicentral intensity relationships, similar to the famous correlations by Keefer (1984). They found that “for coherent slides, the correlation of magnitude versus distance is fairly good and consistent with global datasets […]” while for rockfalls “the correlation is much less evident“. These results help to better estimate the consequences of future moderate to strong EQs in the Apennines. Maybe even more interesting for the fans of ancient earthquakes is the fact that such relationships allow a better analysis of rockfalls and landslides as indicators for paleoseismicity.

Don’t miss the other papers in this book, there is much more for EQ-landslide afficionados in there!

References:

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Christoph Grützner

Christoph Grützner

works at the Institute of Geological Sciences, Jena University. He likes Central Asia and the Mediterranean and looks for ancient earthquakes.

See all posts Christoph Grützner

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