The Great Wenchuan Earthquake eight years on: earthquake damage and coseismic landslides

Last October I was given the chance to attend the “iRALL school on field data collection, monitoring, and modeling of large landslides” in Chengdu, China. During the school, we spent one week in the epicentral area of the Ms=8.0 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, where I was able to take some interesting pictures of earthquake damage and coseismic landslides. Then other things happened, like the earthquakes in Italy and New Zealand, with exciting sights from the field shared here, and I never ended up sharing my Wenchuan pics, which I want to do now. Continue reading “The Great Wenchuan Earthquake eight years on: earthquake damage and coseismic landslides”

Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions

book_front

It’s a book!

Sometimes, things need time to evolve. And when they finally arrive, all laborious work and cumulated frustration is almost immediately forgotten in a flash of joy, a little bit of pride, and a lot of relief. What sounds pretty pathetic here is a summary of the process that lead to the recent Geological Society of London Special Publication 432: Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions. While we will mostly advertise the volume, which should be of broad interest to the Paleoseismicity community (so please buy it, like it, share it!), we would also like to share some thoughts about why four years passed between submission of the volume proposal at the end of 2012 to seeing the book finally in the shelf at the beginning of 2017. Continue reading “Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions”

New report by ISPRA et al. on field evidence of on-fault effects due to the Amatrice earthquake

Lead by ISPRA, scientists from Italy, UK, and Norway have conducted field surveys and remote sensing to analyse the earthquake environmental effects of the 24 August, 2016, Amatrice Earthquake. The team has produced a 31-pages report that covers mainly field work results and INSAR data on ground deformation. Great photos of the surface ruptures! Continue reading “New report by ISPRA et al. on field evidence of on-fault effects due to the Amatrice earthquake”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Sep 2016)

Today’s paper round-up has lots of tsunami papers, including one on the use of DNA to decipher paleo-tsunami deposits. Also, we have some papers about Italy, even from the area of the 24 August Amatrice earthquake. Enjoy reading and please don’t hesitate to tell me which papers I’ve missed.

Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Sep 2016)”

Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part II: Qipan gully debris flow

It’s Friday – but instead of the Friday links I have the story of a giant post earthquake debris flow in the Wenchuan area for you. As I already announced in my last post about the field trip to the Wenchuan earthquake epicenter in frame of the International Symposium on Mega-Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters and Long Term Effects in Chengdu, China, I still wanted to blog about the Qipan gully debris flow that we also visited during the field trip. After giving you some background information I will take you on the hike with us. We will first see massive destruction in the residential area and then have a look at the debris flow deposits and some mitigation structures while climbing up the gully. Come on, let’s go! Continue reading “Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part II: Qipan gully debris flow”

New Special Issue on Paleotsunamis in Annals of Geomorphology

Annals of Geomorphology has now published a new volume on Paleotsunamis in its Supplementary Issues. Issue 57 (4) is all about Reconstructing and modeling palaeotsunami events by multi-proxy geoscientific analyses. The volume is an outcome of the 2011 Corinth conference and edited by Andreas Vött, Klaus Reicherter and Ioannis Papanikolaou. I especially like it not only because I’ve organized the conference, but also because I am familiar with some of the study sites. Finally, I am co-author of the last paper. Continue reading “New Special Issue on Paleotsunamis in Annals of Geomorphology”

Quaternary shortening at the Andean orogenic front (31°-33°S), Argentina: Current issues and challenges

Quaternary shortening at the Andean orogenic front (31°-33°s), Argentina: Current issues and challenges

 Carlos Costa1, Emilio Ahumada1, Benjamin Brooks2, Andrew Meigs3, Lewis Owen4, Thomas Rockwell5, Lindsay Schoenbohm6, Carlos Gardini1, Héctor Cisneros1, Fabricio Vázquez1, 7

  1. Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Argentina. costa@unsl.edu.ar
  2. U.S. Geological Survey, USA
  3. Oregon State University, USA
  4. University of Cincinnati, USA
  5. San Diego State University, USA
  6. University of Toronto, Canada
  7. CONICET

Outstanding exposures, new data, and novel hypotheses developed during the last decade have turned the frontal deformation zone of the Andes between 31°S and 33°S (Fig. 1) into one of the most promising areas worldwide for improving the understanding on mountain building processes and seismic hazards related to thrust tectonics.

Because the Andes are relatively narrow in these latitudes, the geodetic signal in the backarc is dominated by the subduction zone locking process at the Chile trench. Nonetheless the geodetic analysis provides some useful constraints on the location and rates of modern backarc shortening, though not necessarily on the vergence. It is currently understood that backarc shortening occurs at rates of ~4-5mm/yr over a zone that is ~30km wide (across-strike) (Brooks et al., 2003; Kendrick et al., 2006). In the north (31°- 32°10° S) this would imply that the west-vergent, Eastern Precordilleran structures are the most likely to be active, while south of 32°10° S the east-vergent structures in the Southern Precordillera belt are likely to be most active (Fig. 1).

Continue reading “Quaternary shortening at the Andean orogenic front (31°-33°S), Argentina: Current issues and challenges”