AGU Session on Interdisciplinary Tsunami Science

Our colleague Jessica Pilarczyk send us the following message regarding an AGU session on Interdisciplinary Tsunami Science:

Dear paleoseismicity.org members,

We invite you to submit an abstract to the session, “Interdisciplinary Tsunami Science” at the Fall 2017 American Geophysical Union Meeting, to be held in New Orleans 11-15 December. The session description is below. The deadline to submit an abstract is 2 August 23:59 EST/04:59 +1 GMT.

The URL for the abstract submission for this session is: https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm17/nh/papers/index.cgi?sessionid=25672

Bruce Jaffe

Jessica Pilarczyk

Rick Wilson

Finn Løvholt

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5th International Tsunami Field Symposium, 3-7 September 2017, Lisbon/Algarve

The 5th International Tsunami Field Symposium will be held from 3-7 September, 2017, in Lisbon, Portugal. In addition to the scientific sessions an interesting 3-days field trip will take the participants to the tsunami hot spots of the Algarve coast. Visit the official website for more information and make sure to save the date! Continue reading “5th International Tsunami Field Symposium, 3-7 September 2017, Lisbon/Algarve”

IGCP Project 639 “Sea-level changes: From minutes to millenia” – First Meeting Announcement

The IGCP project 639 deals with sea-level changes, coastal earthquakes, and inundation by storms and tsunami: “Sea-level changes: From minutes to millenia”. The first meeting in Oman will take place from 9-14 November 2016 and will cover all science under the IGCP project 639 banner. Make sure to put this on your agenda if you’re interested.

Further details will be forthcoming in the second announcement in the next month. The abstract submission deadline will likely be 1 August, 2016.

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Guest blog by Bastian Schneider (RWTH Aachen University): Tsunami hazard in Muscat, Oman

Tsunamis are a very real threat in the Indian Ocean. Most people will immediately think of the 2004 tsunami and the Sumatra subduction zone, but the Arabian Sea has seen strong tsunamis in the past, too. In 1945, a major earthquake at the Makran Subduction Zone caused a large tsunami (Hoffmann et al., 2013a). In 2013, the on-shore Balochistan earthquake caused a submarine slide which in turn triggered a tsunami that reached the coast of Oman (Heidarzadeh & Satake, 2014; Hoffmann et al., 2014a). There is also evidence for paleotsunamis along Oman’s coast (Hoffmann et al., 2013b; Hoffmann et al., 2014b). Now a team of scientists from RWTH Aachen University (Germany) and GUtech (Muscat, Oman) have published a tsunami inundation scenario for Muscat (Schneider et al., 2016). This is lead author Bastian Schneider’s guest blog on this research: Continue reading “Guest blog by Bastian Schneider (RWTH Aachen University): Tsunami hazard in Muscat, Oman”

Remembering the 1945 Makran Tsunami – Free book: interviews with survivors

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the Makran Earthquake and Tsunami. On 27 November, 1945, an earthquake of magnitude Mw8.1 occurred at the Makran Subduction Zone offshore Pakistan. A large tsunami was triggered that reached the coasts of Pakistan, Iran, India, and Oman. The quake and the waves left approx. 4,000 people dead. A new book collects interviews with survivors. The book has been published by the UNESCO through its Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and is available for free download here. Continue reading “Remembering the 1945 Makran Tsunami – Free book: interviews with survivors”

A new Nuclear Power Plant near Karachi

Tsunami boulder deposits in Oman

Karachi is the most populated city in Pakistan with around 24,000,000 inhabitants – just as many as Australia. Since many years a nuclear power plant (NPP) is located just a few miles outside the city at the shore. Ongoing work on new reactors with Chinese help has recently sparked outrage and media coverage. Concerns are that any accidents at the NPP might have dramatic consequences and threaten millions of people. I searched the recent scientific literature on seismic and tsunami hazard for Karachi…

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Upcoming tsunami conferences

Boats washed ashore near local businesses in down town Aceh, Sumatra following a massive Tsunami

Several meetings on tsunamis will be held during the next months, make sure not to miss them. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. This event was not only one of the most deadly natural disasters that ever happened, but it also was a kind of wake-up call for tsunami science. It’s safe to say that it had an enormous impact on research funding and it is responsible for a huge increase in scientific tsunami literature. The meetings will be a good occasion to share your research. Continue reading “Upcoming tsunami conferences”

An Indian Ocean tsunami triggered remotely by the onshore M7.7 earthquake in Balochistan, Pakistan, on 2013-09-24

On 24 September, 2013, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake occurred in Balochistan, Pakistan. The quake caused intense ground motions and had dramatic consequences – hundreds of people died, and more than 100,000 lost their homes. A secondary effect which caught much attention in the international media was the birth of an island off the Pakistani coast – Zalzala Jazeera or Earthquake Island. Another effect which went almost completely unnoticed was a small tsunami in the Arabian Sea. The tsunami reached wave heights of around 1 m at the Omani coast. In a paper which was recently published in Geology, my colleagues and me document the tsunami effects in Oman. We conclude on a submarine slide off Pakistan as the likely trigger mechanism.

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A paleoseismicity-spy and desert geologist in Alaska

The SSA2014 annual meeting took place in Anchorage, Alaska from 29 April – 2 May. Currently the post-meeting excursion on the effects of the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 is taking place, and we placed our paleoseismicity-spy Gösta Hoffmann in the group. We hope that no one realizes that he’s a desert geologist and absolutely in the wrong place, but he promised to not wear his Teva sandals in order not be identified. Gösta is Associate Professor at the German University of Technology in Oman (GUtech) and works on coastal change and tsunamis, and particularly on tsunamis in the Arabian Sea. Here is his report from Alaska: Continue reading “A paleoseismicity-spy and desert geologist in Alaska”