Call for contributions to textbook ‘Structural Geology and Tectonics: Problems and Solutions’

Our colleague Åke Fagereng from Cardiff University will edit a textbook on problems in structural geology and tectonics together with Soumyajit Mukherjee and Andrea Billi. The editors invite contributions from the tectonics community. Perhaps you have a nice active tectonics exercise to share? Here is the announcement: Continue reading “Call for contributions to textbook ‘Structural Geology and Tectonics: Problems and Solutions’”

Short Course in Structural Geology and Tectonics of Hokkaido

An interesting post-grad student training course will be held from 26 June – 7 July, 2017, at Hokkaido University:
Structural Geology and Tectonics of Hokkaido: Geometric principles, and the relationship between active and ancient deformation.
During this course you will learn how geologic structures, developed from microscopic to map scale, reflect the rates, directions, and mechanics of past and contemporary plate tectonics and deformation. You will also hone your three-dimensional perception and skills through practical applications.

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Tectonic Studies Group field trip to Death Valley, April 2017

The Tectonic Studies Group (TSG) will organise a field trip to Death Valley in April 2017. The trip will be of particular interest for those who wish to learn more about tectono-volcanic processes, tectono-sedimentary processes, and the Basin and Range/ San Andreas system.

The trip is being organised and delivered by Phil Benson & Derek Rust of the University of Portsmouth. Continue reading “Tectonic Studies Group field trip to Death Valley, April 2017”

GSGS Summer School on Dates and Rates of Change in the Quaternary, August 2016, Cologne, Germany

An interesting summer school will be held near Cologne, Germany, from 21-27 August 2016. The GSGS Summer School on Dates and Rates of Change in the Quaternary is devoted to teach all different kinds of Quaternary dating methods such as Ar/Ar, cosmogenic nuclides, luminescence, palaeolimnology, palaeomagnetism, radiocarbon and tephrochronology. It is designed for PhD students, postdoctoral researchers and advanced master’s students in geosciences and will be held in English. Deadline for application is 10 June. The workshop is free for all accepted participants. The summer school is funded through the Institutional Strategy of the University of Cologne and supported by the Geoverbund ABC/J. That’s a great opportunity, make sure to apply before it’s too late!

Thanks to Silke for spreading the news.

My top ten list of earthquake blogs

I am running this blog for more than five years now and it is time to acknowledge the other geo-blogs out there that have inspired me. In order to stay updated I follow the Geobulletin, which monitors the geoblogosphere activity. There are numerous amazing blogs out there that are either fun to read or interesting or both, but here I will focus on the ones dealing with earthquakes/tectonics/geomorphology/tsunamis. Here is my personal, subjective, but honest, list of earthquake blogs that I like and read: Continue reading “My top ten list of earthquake blogs”

Deform2015, thematic school about crustal deformation and earthquakes

The Deform2015 school on Active Deformation, Faults and Earthquakes from Measurements to Models will be held in Southern France from 7-13 February, 2015.
Over the past years, considerable advances have been made in observing crustal deformation at scales of seconds to thousands of years.
However, a unified view of the earthquake cycle is still missing. The thematic school aims at bringing together students and scientists
working on different aspects of active faulting and earthquake processes. This school will provide a state-of-the-art view of the technics used to study active deformation as well as a perspective on the current models integrating the growing corpus of available data.

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Nice videoblog on geology (in Spanish) – Un geólogo en apuros

While the majority of geoscience blogs is in English, I personally have the feeling that Spanish must be the second most popular language in the geoblogosphere. Videoblogs are not so numerous, but there are some really good ones out there. Nahúm Méndez Chazarra‘s Un geólogo en apuros (A geologist in trouble) is one of them. He writes ‘normal’ blog posts, but also produces nice videos. Nahum mainly blogs about earthquakes, geology in general, the geology of the Iberian Peninsula, and geoscience education. Make sure to check out his latest piece on Folklore geológico in which he informs about the cultural perception of earthquakes in Spain. Continue reading “Nice videoblog on geology (in Spanish) – Un geólogo en apuros”

Share your results with qgis2leaf

As we are often use geodata and analyse, store them or visualize them using a GIS we depend somehow on the person on the other side to understand how a GIS functions or how to use the GIS. A webmap- like the well know google maps- is therefore an easy way to communicate your data and results. But creating a webmap is not always a funny thing to do as we are more geoscientists than programmers. QGIS2leaf for QGIS is a great plugin for creating a basic webmap. Continue reading “Share your results with qgis2leaf”

Fieldtrip guide for download: 4D Architecture of an Oblique Rift Margin – Paleoseismology of the Borrego and Laguna Salada Faults (MEX)

The Friends of the Pleistocene went on a fieldtrip few days ago to study the 4D Architecture of an Oblique Rift Margin in Baja California, NW Mexico. The tour focussed on the paleoseismology of the Borrega and Laguna Salada Faults, especially on the 1982 and 2010 surface ruptures, and took place fom 27 February to 2 March, 2014. You can download the detailed field guide and the road log here. Continue reading “Fieldtrip guide for download: 4D Architecture of an Oblique Rift Margin – Paleoseismology of the Borrego and Laguna Salada Faults (MEX)”