Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions

book_front

It’s a book!

Sometimes, things need time to evolve. And when they finally arrive, all laborious work and cumulated frustration is almost immediately forgotten in a flash of joy, a little bit of pride, and a lot of relief. What sounds pretty pathetic here is a summary of the process that lead to the recent Geological Society of London Special Publication 432: Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions. While we will mostly advertise the volume, which should be of broad interest to the Paleoseismicity community (so please buy it, like it, share it!), we would also like to share some thoughts about why four years passed between submission of the volume proposal at the end of 2012 to seeing the book finally in the shelf at the beginning of 2017. Continue reading “Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions”

Paper: The Canterbury earthquake sequence and earthquake environmental effects

Now that the new dates for the 8th PATA Days 2017 in New Zealand are fixed, it is time to bring to your attention an exceptional paper that was already published in 2016. I planned to write a review long time ago, but I just managed to do so now. The paper by Quigley et al. is not only likely to become your favourite read during the long flight to New Zealand, but it will also serve as an extremely valuable contribution to the study of earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) in general. The authors report on, and summarise, the effects that the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence had on the environment. The paper is special in many ways: Continue reading “Paper: The Canterbury earthquake sequence and earthquake environmental effects”

From coastal earthquake geology and semi-automated feature detection

In microtidal seas such as the Mediterranean (tidal range ≈0.4 m sea-level indicators are commonly used to infer coseismic history. A list containing these indicators is long, including wave-cut platforms, marine terraces, displaced beach rock, biological agents, sedimentological and stratigraphical indicators, and archaeological indicators. Obviously, the trustworthiness varies a lot from one to another. For deriving late Holocene coastal tectonic activity, one of the most commonly used sea-level marker activity are tidal notches. These form distinct morphological and ecological erosional features developed within the tidal range [Pirazzoli, 1986; Antonioli et al., 2015]. Continue reading “From coastal earthquake geology and semi-automated feature detection”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Feb 2017)

This year has already seen a good amount of publications that might be interesting for the paleoseismicity community. Since it’s still rather unpleasant outside (at least here in the UK), why not lean back in your comfy chair, drink a cup of tea and read some exciting new science? Today we have interesting papers on old earthquakes, seismic hazard, paleoseismology, speleoseismology, the ESI-scale, fault physics, tsunamis, and space geodesy. Plus, tectonic lunomorphology – fault scarps on the moon. Enjoy reading! Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Feb 2017)”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jan 2017)

I wish you a successful and wonderful new year 2017! May you find impressive faults and good outcrops, may your trenches always be in the right place, and may your samples return good results. If 2017 brings you something that would be of interest to the paleoseismicity.org community, please let us know. In the mean time, enjoy those reads: Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jan 2017)”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Dec 2016)

A continuous flow of images from the New Zealand earthquake reaches the earthquake geology community, and we’re probably all amazed by the coseismic offsets and other earthquake effects. However, the flow of papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics also does not stop and here is my digest for December. Enjoy reading!

Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Dec 2016)”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Oct 2016)

A lot of new papers have been published on paleoseismology, earthquake geology, active tectonics and tsunamis last month. We have research on slowly deforming regions, on the active tectonics of Mexico, New Zealand, Armenia, and Iran, new data from the Kumamoto earthquake, plus some marine/coastal paleoseismology and tsunami studies. Enjoy reading!

Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Oct 2016)”

Report on the coseismic effects of the 24 August 2016 Amatrice Earthquake

The EMERGEO Working Group has conducted extensive field work after the 24 August 2016 Amatrice Earthquake in Italy and put together a report on the coseismic effects. The report is in English and can be downloaded from the INGV earthquake Blog here: PDF (6.1 mb)

The report includes data on environmental earthquake effects like surface ruptures, fractures, landslides, and rockfalls. More than 2400 data points have been collected.

Please cite the report as follows:

  • EMERGEO Working Group (2016). The 24 August 2016 Amatrice Earthquake: Coseismic Effects. doi: 10.5281/zenodo.61568

The EMERGEO Working Group consists of Pucci S., De Martini P.M., Nappi R., Pantosti D., Civico R., Ricci T., Moro M., Cinti F., Brunori C.A., Di Naccio D., Sapia V., De Ritis R., Gori S., Falcucci E., Caciagli M., Pinzi S., Villani F., Gaudiosi G., Burrato P., Vannoli P., Kastelic V., Montone P., Carafa M., Patera A., Vallone R. (all INGV) and Saroli M., Lo Sardo L., Lancia M. (University of Cassino and southern Lazio).

Thanks to Francesca Cinti for pointing me to this!