Sessions of interest at EGU 2016

The EGU General Assembly 2016 will be held in Vienna from 17-22 April, and the abstract deadline on 13 January 2016 is coming closer and closer. So if you haven’t already submitted your paper, keep this deadline in mind! Here are some warmly recommended sessions related to paleoseismology:

1) NH5.7/GM12.6/SSP3.20 Geological records of extreme wave events (co-organized). Conveners: Ed Garrett, Jessica Pilarczyk, Max Engel, Dominik Brill, Simon Matthias May

Even though I haven’t posted on this blog for years (sorry, Christoph…), I greatly appreciate the opportunity to advertise our session gathering all types of geological investigations, including both field studies and modelling approaches, which foster our understanding on tsunamis and high-magnitude storm surges. We welcome contributions on (i) sedimentary and geomorphological evidence of high-energy wave events from low and high energy environments, from low and high latitude regions and from coastal and offshore areas, (ii) novel dating approaches, (iii) numerical and experimental modelling studies of high-energy coastal sediment transport, and (iv) probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment based on geological data. Continue reading “Sessions of interest at EGU 2016”

Earthquake Geology sessions at the 16 World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Chile, 2017

The 16 World Conference on Earthquake Engineering will be held from 9-13 January, 2017, in Santiago de Chile. Note that the deadline for short abstracts submission is 23 November, 2015! Abstracts can be submitted via this link.

This meeting comes with a number of sessions which are interesting for earthquake geologists, paleoseismologists and those of us who deal with seismic hazard assessments. Among them: Continue reading “Earthquake Geology sessions at the 16 World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Chile, 2017”

14th International Conference of the Geological Society of Greece – deadline 30 Sept.

Greece is a Disneyland for neotectonics and active faulting research. Some of the most important findings in earthquake science have been achieved in Greece, its historical catalogue is one of the longest on Earth, and paleoseismology, archaeoseismology & tsunami studies are abundant. These are many good reasons to consider registration for the 14th Int’l Conference of the Geological Society of Greece (Thessaloniki, May 25-27, 2016), especially since the programme is full of earthquake science stuff. The deadline for submitting papers is September 30.

Continue reading “14th International Conference of the Geological Society of Greece – deadline 30 Sept.”

Surface ruptures of the 1891 Nobi earthquake

At the XIX INQUA congress in Japan I had the chance to see the surface ruptures of the 1891 Nobi earthquake during the mid-congress excursion M-2. This quake caused huge damage, but more interestingly for me, it produced amazing surface ruptures which are preserved even more than a hundred years after the event. The M7.5-M8 quake occurred in a mountainous area and was mainly strike-slip (more than 8 m!), but significant vertical uplift was found at step-overs. In 1991, the wonderful Neodani Fault Museum opened to the public, its main attraction being a paleoseismological trench exhibiting more than 5 m of vertical offset! Simply astonishing. Thanks to Atsumasa Okada, Heitaro Kaneda and Keitaro for this great excursion! Continue reading “Surface ruptures of the 1891 Nobi earthquake”

Final deadline for international workshop “Advances in Active Tectonics and Speleotectonics” in Vienna tomorrow!

Just as a reminder for all interested in visiting Vienna in September 21–24, 2015 and participate on the international workshop “Advances in Active Tectonics and Speleotectonics”:

The final deadline for registration and abstract submission is approaching tomorrow (July, 31st, 2015).

There will be great field trips to active faults in the Vienna Basin (currently excavated) and to Austrian caves showing ongoing deformation. For more details, dates and contacts please visit the website http://www.nhm-wien.ac.at/AATS_Workshop_2015

Looking forward to seeing you in Vienna!

Sincerely,

Esther Hintersberger, Kurt Decker, Lukas Plan, Ivo Baron, Ivanka Mitrovic

2015 GSA Session “Estimating the Timing and Characteristics of Continental Earthquakes from Geologic Data”

The 2015 GSA Annual Meeting will be held in early November in Baltimore and since the deadline is approaching (11 August) it is time to check paleoseismology sessions. One of the many interesting sessions will be chaired by our colleagues Mark Quigley and Tim Stahl: “T186 – Estimating the Timing and Characteristics of Continental Earthquakes from Geologic Data”. Tim told me that there will be “some great invited speakers lined up speaking on paleoliquefaction, lake varve deposits and San Andreas fault paleoseismology“. Continue reading “2015 GSA Session “Estimating the Timing and Characteristics of Continental Earthquakes from Geologic Data””

TERPRO business meeting at the INQUA2015 congress in Nagoya

The INQUA 2015 congress in Nagoya will not only be the place to catch up with latest science news, but also to elect new commissions and project leaders and to plan and co-ordinate the ongoing activities for the inter-congress period. Therefore, think about joining the relevant business meeting! INQUA is organized in several commissions, of which TERPRO (Terrestrial Processes) is the one which covers paleoseismology, active tectonics and tectonic geomorphology. The IFG Palacte (Int’l Focus Group Paleosesimology/active tectonics) is a sub-organization of TERPRO itself. The TERPRO Business Meeting will be held on the evening (19:00-20:30) of Tue, 28 July in room 431, and will focus on the new Commission structure and programs for the intercongress period 2015 – 2019. Continue reading “TERPRO business meeting at the INQUA2015 congress in Nagoya”

Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part II: Qipan gully debris flow

It’s Friday – but instead of the Friday links I have the story of a giant post earthquake debris flow in the Wenchuan area for you. As I already announced in my last post about the field trip to the Wenchuan earthquake epicenter in frame of the International Symposium on Mega-Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters and Long Term Effects in Chengdu, China, I still wanted to blog about the Qipan gully debris flow that we also visited during the field trip. After giving you some background information I will take you on the hike with us. We will first see massive destruction in the residential area and then have a look at the debris flow deposits and some mitigation structures while climbing up the gully. Come on, let’s go! Continue reading “Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part II: Qipan gully debris flow”

Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part I: Wenchuan epicenter

In my last post I blogged about the International Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters and Long Term Effects in Chengdu, China, and now I want to report about one of the field trips that I participated after the symposium. While we spent the morning and early afternoon at the Qipan gully to look at a giant debris flow that occurred five years after the earthquake, in the afternoon we had the chance to visit the memorial site of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, which is basically the collapsed building of a middle school close to the epicenter that was left as it was after the earthquake. I want to report about this site first because it is more about the earthquake itself. In my next post I will report about the Qipan gully debris flow. Continue reading “Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part I: Wenchuan epicenter”