Posts in the category »  Earthquake «  ( 111 Posts )

  • Earthquakes in Italy: first InSAR data and field reconnaissance

    On 26 October two shallow normal faulting earthquakes occurred in Central Italy, very close to the epicentre of the Amatrice Earthquake from earlier this year. The first quake reached a magnitude of M5.5 and was followed by a M6.1 just two hours later. The events caused serious damage (see here for a video and some images), but luckily only one person died as most people had left their houses after the first moderate shock. This could have turned out much worse. Apparently the quakes at least partly filled the gap between the 1997 Colfiorito events and the 2016 Amatrice Earthquake. more

  • Report on the coseismic effects of the 24 August 2016 Amatrice Earthquake

    The EMERGEO Working Group has conducted extensive field work after the 24 August 2016 Amatrice Earthquake in Italy and put together a report on the coseismic effects. The report is in English and can be downloaded from the INGV earthquake Blog here: PDF (6.1 mb)

    The report includes data on environmental earthquake effects like surface ruptures, fractures, landslides, and rockfalls. More than 2400 data points have been collected.

    Please cite the report as follows:

    • EMERGEO Working Group (2016). The 24 August 2016 Amatrice Earthquake: Coseismic Effects. doi: 10.5281/zenodo.61568

    The EMERGEO Working Group consists of Pucci S., De Martini P.M., Nappi R., Pantosti D., Civico R., Ricci T., Moro M., Cinti F., Brunori C.A., Di Naccio D., Sapia V., De Ritis R., Gori S., Falcucci E., Caciagli M., Pinzi S., Villani F., Gaudiosi G., Burrato P., Vannoli P., Kastelic V., Montone P., Carafa M., Patera A., Vallone R. (all INGV) and Saroli M., Lo Sardo L., Lancia M. (University of Cassino and southern Lazio).

    Thanks to Francesca Cinti for pointing me to this!

     

  • Video: Special Session on the Amatrice Earthquake at the 88º Congresso della Società Geologica Italiana, Naples, 7 September 2016

    A special session on the Amatrice Earthquake of 24 August in Italy was held at the Congress of the Geological Society of Italy (Naples, 7 September, 2016). A video of the entire session is now available online. Although the talks are in Italian, it is easy to understand and the slides tell the story.

    See the full video here: more

  • Special session on the Amatrice Earthquake at the Congresso Società Geologica Italiana, 7 September, Napoli

    There will be a Special Session on the Amatrice Earthquake of 24 August at the Congresso Società Geologica Italiana, 7 September, 2016, in Napoli. See http://www.sginapoli2016.it/home/ for the congress details.

    Session programme:

    Il terremoto del centro Italia del 24 agosto 2016 7 settembre 2016, ore 20.00, Aula tbd

    Chairmen: Carlo Doglioni, Alessandro Maria Michetti

    • 20.00 – INGV Amatrice working group : La sequenza sismica di Amatrice 2016
    • 20.10 – Bonano M., Castaldo R., Casu F., De Luca C., De Novellis V., Lanari R., Manunta M., Manzo M., Pepe A., Pepe S., Tizzani P., Zinno I. : Deformazione superficiale associata al terremoto del centro Italia del 24 agosto 2016: primi risultati da interferometria radar dallo spazio
    • 20.20 – Lavecchia G., Brozzetti F., Boncio P., de Nardis, Cirillo, Ferrarini: controllo strutturale sulla sequenza sismica di Accumoli 2016 – analisi preliminare
    • 20.30 – Blumetti A.M., Bonadeo L., Brunamonte F., Comerci V., Cowie P., Di Manna P., Ferrario M.F., Faure Walker J., Frigerio C., Fumanti F., Gregory L., Guerrieri L., Iezzi F., Livio F., McCaffrey K., Michetti A.M., Mildon Z., Phillips R., Piccardi L., Pompili R., Rhodes E., Roberts G., Vittori E., Walters R.J., Wedmore L., Wilkinson M. : Rotture al suolo ed effetti ambientali associati al terremoto del centro Italia del 24 agosto 2016: risultati preliminari e work in progress.
    • 20.40 – Galli P. et al. : Distribuzione dell’intensità macrosismica e implicazioni sismotettoniche del terremoto del centro Italia del 24 agosto 2016:
    • 20.50 – Amanti M. : Eventi franosi nell’area epicentrale del terremoto di Amatrice.
  • Fault Displacement Hazards Workshop, Dec 8-9th, 2016 (and AGU Fall meeting session)

    Dear Colleagues,

    We would like to bring your attention to a workshop we are organizing on the topic of Fault Displacement Hazard Analysis (FDHA). The Workshop will be held December 8-9th at the U.S. Geological Survey Campus in Menlo Park, CA, and is timed to be the Thursday and Friday before the 2016 AGU Fall meeting so that international participants can plan to attend both the Workshop and AGU the following week.

    Workshop themes will include: more

  • Ruptured pebbles – ever found one?

    Ruptured pebbles are frequently found near and along active faults. At RWTH Aachen University Christopher Weismüller has just finished his MSc thesis on ruptured pebbles in southern Spain. There, the NE-SW trending Carboneras Fault System meets the N-S trending Palomares Fault and ends. more

  • New papers on paleoseismology in the Tien Shan

    Between 1885 and 1938, the northern Tien Shan at the border between present Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan experienced a remarkable series of five major earthquakes, exceeding M6.9 and reaching up to M ~ 8 (1885 Belovodskoe M6.9, 1887 Verny M7.3, 1889 Chilik M~8, 1911 Chon Kemin M8, and 1938 Kemino Chu M6.9). Combined, the seismic moments add up to almost moment magnitude 9, which is a significant amount of strain released in roughly 50 years and across an E-W stretch of less than 500 kilometers. Even more intriguing is the fact that the ruptured region is located more than thousand km north of the nearest plate boundary and associated India-Eurasia collision zone. The macroseismic areas of these earthquakes include the present-day capital of Kyrgyzstan, Bishkek (Frunze) and the former capital and still largest city of Kazakhstan, Almaty (earlier names Alma Ata and Verny).
    more

  • Mapping the coseismic effects of the Ecuador earthquake(s)

    A team of Ecuadorian and French geologists has started to map the coseismic effects of the M7.8 earthquake that hit Ecuador on 16 April, 2016. The quake occurred at a depth of about 20 km and caused more than 600 fatalities, mainly in the area near Muisne. Two strong aftershocks of M6.7 and M6.8 shook the epicentral area on 18 May, among hundreds of smaller shocks that were recorded. The mapping is coordinated by the Instituto Geofísico. First results show earthquake environmental effects like liquefaction, mud venting, and surface cracks. Some impressions from the field work can be found here:

    http://www.igepn.edu.ec/servicios/noticias/1332-levantamiento-geologico-de-los-efectos-del-sismo-del-16-de-abril-en-la-zona-entre-esmeraldas-y-manta

    more

  • Earthquake Geology of the 16 April, 2016, Kumamoto Earthquake – report by Koji Okumura

    On 16 April an earthquake of magnitude Mw7.0 hit the district of Kumamoto, Kyushu Island, Japan. The quake was preceeded by a Mw6.1 foreshock one day before. It occurred on the ENE striking, right lateral Futagawa-Hinagu fault zone. Our colleague Koji Okumura from Hiroshima University has prepared a short report on this surface-rupturing event. Download the report here (PDF, 612 kb). The report will be continuously revised and corrected, so check for regular updates. Thanks Koji for providing this summary!

  • A Holocene surface rupture in Germany

    I am quite happy that our new paper has finally been published in GJI. We worked on a fault between Aachen and Cologne in Germany and found that there has been a surface rupturing earthquake less than 9000 years ago, and possibly not much older than 2500 years BP. The area is of interest also because in 1755/56 a series of damaging earthquakes hit Düren and its surroundings – these are the strongest historical events in Germany that we know of. The quakes were felt as far away as Berlin, Strasbourg, and London, yet there were no primary ruptures. “Our” quake must have been much stronger… more

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