Jefferson Williams

Jefferson Williams

Jefferson Williams is a Geologist, Geophysicist, and Engineer who is a specialist in the acoustic properties of sediments. He possesses Bachelor degrees in Geology and Mechanical Engineering as well as Master’s Degrees in Electrical and Civil Engineering. He started his career as a Field Seismologist and later branched into Borehole Geophysics. Since 1998, he has been conducting independent research in the Dead Sea on Historical Earthquakes and Geomythology. He is a member of SEG, SAG-AFTRA, and SPWLA.

  • Using Dust and Pollen to sleuth the origin of lacustrine seismites

    For quite some time (~7 years), I have been noticing that Holocene Dead Sea seismites frequently have a thin dark flat lying fine grained  layer of sediment on top. When I finally gained access to some electron microscopes at Cambridge University in 2013, I saw that these thin layers were very fine grained. After consultation with Dust Geologist Dr. Ken Pye, I came to the conclusion that they appeared to be proximal dust deposits. It was around that time that I realized that Dead Sea earthquakes probably kicked up dust clouds that then settled atop the seismite. An example of a dust cloud kicked up by an earthquake in Mexico is featured in my crowd funding pitch video (Jerusalem Quake Seasonality on Kickstarter ) and can be seen here (Mountain front dust clouds – Mexicali Quake of 2010 ). Christoph Gruetzner, who is also intrigued by the link between seismicity and dust, has accumulated a number of videos showing “dustquakes” on his YouTube channel[1]. more

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