Andreas Rudersdorf

Andreas Rudersdorf

loves finding and exploring faults using remote sensing and shallow geophysics. No matter if slowly active, buried or just undiscovered! He is studing neotectonics in the Gobi desert at RWTH Aachen University.

  • What’s up? The Friday links (81)

    There are articles to read, videos to watch and positions to be found: paleoseismology of Chilean turbidites, lake sediments investigated near the North Anatolian Fault, indoor footage of the Gorkha Earthquake and a discussion on Elsevier’s new sharing policies. Today is Friday and here are your links!

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (80)

    Here are some links I collected on today’s Kent Earthquake, the impossible task of earthquake prediction and some videos on Structure From Motion and Pacific tsunami propagation. Today is Friday and here are your links!

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  • NSF-sponsored workshop on Future Directions in Tectonics

    Future research in tectonics and structural geology is the focus of an NSF-sponsored workshop to be held in Madison, Wisconsin on July 22-24, 2015 – aimed to assemble a diverse range of earth scientists to identify pertinent and promising areas of new research, recognize and prioritize infrastructure needs that are necessary to making scientific progress, and articulate the societal relevance of research in tectonics and structural
    geology in the 21st Century. The vision articulated at the workshop will be captured in a white paper, the first of its kind since 2004, that will inform our science community, funding agencies, elected officials, and the general public.

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (79)

    The Geoblogosphere is full of links on the Gorkha Earthquake in Nepal – and we have some links on this major event, too. But we found also some few more links on creating beautiful scientific posters, hilarious geomemes, and more. Today is Friday and here are your links!

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  • Fucino2015 meeting: Twitter roundup

    The 2015 INQUA International Workshop on Active Tectonics, Paleoseismology and Archaeoseismology in the Fucino Basin is over – but luckily some of the scientists have covered the meeting on Twitter! For those who missed the meeting in Italy, read and enjoy this recap – you might want to consider going to the next PATA Days.

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (78)

    Welcome back from all the EGU Vienna, SSA Pasadena and INQUA Fucino meetings during the last days. You have missed a lot of stunning images. Today is Friday and here are your links!

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (77)

    Are you preparing your contribution to the EGU General Assembly next week? We found some short-courses and sessions, that might be interesting for you. Did you vote in the TournamentEarth? A great image won.  Today is Friday and here are your links!

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (76)

    Do you know your birthquake? And what do you think about animal behaviour before earthquakes? Did you hear about the NPG initative on an outsourced, but accelerated review process? Today is Good Friday, and here are your links!

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (75)

    Pieces of history, mapping faults, and maps – today is Friday and here are your links!

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (74)

    The Big One covered the news this week – didn’t you notice? We’re back with news and links on the long-term erthquake forecast for California, the reawakened Oklahoma faults, the UN Disaster Risk Reduction conference, an image tournament, and more. Today is Friday and here are your links!

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