Christoph Grützner

Christoph Grützner

works at the Institute of Geological Sciences, Jena University. He likes Central Asia and the Mediterranean and looks for ancient earthquakes.

  • Earthquake series hits Christchurch, NZ, causing liquefaction, landslides

    On Monday, 13 June, Christchurch was again rocked by earthquakes that caused damages and left people injured. Three significant events happened within two hours. At 1:00 UTC a mb5.0 event occured, followed by a Mw6.0 at 2:20 UTC and a M4.6 at 2:40 UTC. The strongest event caused instrumental intensities of up to VII close to the city. Update: Geonet reports a magnitude of 6.3. more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (13)

    Sorry for starting with a non-geological link again, but it’s important: We have two more elements! Well, two more names in the periodic table at least: Flerovium (element 114, atomic mass 289) and Moscovium (element 116, atomic mass 292). Welcome! more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (12)

    I am not sure if the geoscience community has realized that astronomy made three steps forward recently, so I’ll start out of topic. Three major astronomical problems have been solved! Really! more

  • Corinth2011 – Registration re-opened, 20 places left!

    Dear colleagues and friends,

    the registration for the Corinth2011 workshop is open again. Due to additional capacities at the conference venue we can offer 20 more places! You can register via the paleoseismicity.org website. However, the abstract submission is closed. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

    Have a nice weekend and looking forward to seeing you in Corinth,

    The Organization Committee

  • The Wednesday Centerfault (5)

    After we dealt with some faults in Greece, let’s move to Spain. The Ventas de Zafarraya Fault (VZF) west of the Granada basin (36.96° N, 4.14°W) has a beautiful morphologic expression and an exciting history. The fault bounds the Zafarraya polje to the south, with Quaternary sediments to the north (hanging wall) and limestones of the Internal Subbetics in the footwall. more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (11)

    Because of the recent news, these Friday links will deal with earthquake prediction. As in the L’Aquila case and in the Judgment Day “prophecy”, a reliable prediction is not possible until now. Repeat: NOT POSSIBLE! more

  • The Wednesday Centerfault (4)

    This day’s Centerfault is the Sparta Fault in southern Greece (37.1°N 23.3°E). Being situated on the Peloponessus, the fault marks one of the most prominent geomorphological features of the peninsula. It is famous for the historical 464 BC earthquake that destroyed ancient Sparta. However,  the days of Spartian glory ended much later after a severe military defeat in the battle of Leuctra in 371 BC, Sparta never fully recovered. more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (10)

    Today’s Friday links concentrate on tsunamis. Recently, Pure and Applied Geophysics came up with quite a lot of tsunami papers, and I am sure that this decision was made before the Japan tsunami happened. Some papers fur sure are interesting for analysing past tsunamis and earthquake environmental effects.

    more

  • New paper on the paleoseismicity of the Dead Sea – Kagan et al., 2011

    Some days ago a new paper on the paleoseismicity of the Dead Sea area during the late Holocene has been published in JGR. Kagan et al, 2011 investigated two new study sites in the northern and southern parts of the Dead Sea Basin and compared the seismites found there with the information of the Ein Gedi core presented by Migowski et al., 2004.

    more

  • The Wednesday Centerfault (1)

    It’s not easy to prepare weekly Friday links when you are abroad, this is what I had to realize in April. However, I will try to post a natural beauty each Wednesday in the future, the Wednesday Centerfaults and Centerfolds.

    Today, I start with the Kaparelli Fault in Greece (38.22°N, 23.23°E). This beautiful limestone fault scarp is more than 2.5 km long and up to 5 m high. The fault was activated during the 1981 Corinth earthquakes. more

Newsletter

Just click the "Unsubscribe" link which you find in every newsletter you get and your email adress will be removed from the subscribers list in seconds.

Facebook

} ?>

Sharing Options

Digg this
Delicious
Stumbleupon
Reddit
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Google +
The paleosesismicity.org group on LinkedIn
Subscribe to the paleoseismicity Newsletter