6th Int’l Colloquium Historical earthquakes & paleoseismology, 24-26 Oct, 2018, Han-sur-Lesse (BEL)

The 6th International Colloquium on Historical earthquakes & paleoseismology studies will be held from 24-25 October, 2018, in Han-sur-Lesse (Belgium). The meeting will focus on the contribution of paleoseismology/hist. seismology studies to the knowledge of the long-term seismic activity and to seismic hazard assessment.

On 26 October, 2018, a field trip will lead to the Han-sur-Lesse and Rochefort caves. The meeting will be organised by the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Continue reading “6th Int’l Colloquium Historical earthquakes & paleoseismology, 24-26 Oct, 2018, Han-sur-Lesse (BEL)”

Paleoseismology sessions at the LACSC/SSA Seismology of the Americas meeting, 14-17 May, 2018, Miami, FL

The 2018 SSA meeting was planned to take place in Puerto Rico in April as a joint meeting of the Latin American and Caribbean Seismological Commission (LACSC) and the Seismological Society of America (SSA). After hurricane Maria hit the island earlier this year, the decision was made to move to Miami, FL and to run the meeting from 14-17 May, 2018.
A number of exciting sessions will deal with active tectonics and paleoseismology:

Continue reading “Paleoseismology sessions at the LACSC/SSA Seismology of the Americas meeting, 14-17 May, 2018, Miami, FL”

Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know

Almaty, the former capital of Kazakhstan and home to ~2 million people, is a rapidly growing, vibrant city, beautifully situated at the foothills of the mighty Zailisky Alatau, the northernmost mountain range of the Tien Shan at this longitude. The city sits on a huge alluvial fan with the snow-capped mountains in the background, reaching 5,000 m elevation. Almaty has suffered from earthquakes in its young history: in 1887, the Verny earthquake with a magnitude of about 7.3 had its epicentre a few kilometres west of the city but did not produce surface ruptures (Verny is the old name of Almaty). Only two years later, the M8 Chilik earthquake ruptured the surface 100 km to the southeast of Almaty. Finally, Almaty was heavily damaged by the 1911 Chon Kemin earthquake with a magnitude of ~8, which occurred on the southern flank of the Zailisky Alatau. In our new paper we now report on a fault that did not rupture in historical times, but surely did so in the Holocene – and this fault is right beneath the city. Continue reading “Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know”