Open position: PostDoc on seismic hazard characterization & mitigation, Aix-en-Provence

The CEREGE laboratory in Aix-en-Provence (France) look for a PostDoc in the field of seismic hazard and/or earthquake geology. The position is in the framework of the RISKMED OT MED funded project “ Natural risks in the Mediterranean: Hazard, vulnerability, perception and management”.

Deadline for application is 4 July.

Tasks:

  • Organisation and implementation of field surveys in Italy and Turkey in collaboration with local colleagues.
  • Review and compile existing data, and acquire new data to better understand the frequency and dynamics of large earthquakes in Central Italy and western Turkey through surface observations and paleoseismological reconstruction over a range of different temporal and spatial scales.
  • Convert all data into an open database.
  • Analyze and interpret all data with respect to existing scaling laws and in terms of seismic hazard.
  • Produce with social scientists engaged in the project (geographers and psychologists) comprehensible scientific information to public and territorial managers as the basis for recommended preparedness and mitigation actions.
  • Participate to a participatory process and to focus groups concerning risk mitigation strategies (science communication, risk communication, public outreach) in targeted areas.

See the full details here.

Open position: Postdoctoral Research Assistant in Active Tectonics, Univ. Oxford

The University of Oxford is looking for a PostDoc research assistant under the direction of Professor Richard Walker and Professor Philip England to work on active tectonics in China. The focus is on the Hexi corridor and the Qilian Shan of Gansu. Deadline for application is 15 July 2016.

Tasks include:

  • Detailed mapping of palaeo-earthquake ruptures
  • Construction of slip distributions from individual earthquakes
  • Selection of sites for long-term slip-rate determination using field investigations, high-resolution satellite imagery and digital topography
  • Planning and carrying out fieldwork to verify remote-sensing observations, to collect samples for dating, and to excavate and interpret palaeo-seismic trenches

See the full job description here.

Those were the PATA Days 2016 in Crestone, CO

 

The 7th International INQUA Workshop on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics and Archaeoseismology (PATA Days) took place last week in Crestone, CO. The meeting was organised by Jim McCalpin who did an amazing job – thanks Jim for inviting us to Crestone and for this wonderful conference. Prior to the meeting a six-day road trip to the Faults of the Wild West lead a group of ~20 people to the legendary sites of western US faults: Borah Peak, the Tetons, Wasatch, etc. On 29 May most participants gathered in Denver where the icebreaker took place. Early in the morning next day we started with a pre-meeting field trip to Crestone, driving into the Rocky Mountains, passing South Park, and arriving at Crestone just on time for lunch. Continue reading “Those were the PATA Days 2016 in Crestone, CO”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (June 2016)

It’s June and it’s time for a new paper round-up, isn’t it? When I compiled the list during the past weeks I already realized that there’s a lot of new literature out there, and I guess this month’s post is probably the longest list we’ve ever had – 21 articles! So here are the latest papers on paleoseismology, tsunamis (maaaany tsunami papers this time), and active tectonics. As always: Any suggestions are highly appreciated. Enjoy reading!

 

Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (June 2016)”

Classification of earthquake-induced landslide event sizes

 

Some weeks ago we published a new study on the classification of earthquake-induced landslide event sizes based on seismotectonic, topographic, climatic and geologic factors. Our idea was that this classification could be used to help improve seismic hazard assessment by contributing to a better prediction of landslide hazards induced by an earthquake when the geologic, topographic and climatic context is well defined. Possible applications could be the short-term prediction right after an earthquake or scenario modeling, e.g. for critical infrastructure. Since earthquake triggered landslide event sizes are also an important proxy for the estimation of magnitude and intensity of past earthquakes, I thought our study might be interesting for the paleoseismicity community as well, and so I put together a brief summary.

Continue reading “Classification of earthquake-induced landslide event sizes”