5 th PATA Days in Busan, Korea, news from the meeting, field trips

The second day of the meeting revealed very nice and interesting talks of the Korean geologists and paleoseismologists, which was an excellent preparation for the upcoming post-meeting field trips on the following days. Talker of the day was Dr Tom Rockwell, he gave three talks and lectures, however one as replacement for Bill Lettis, who wasn´t able to come to Korea. Before dinner a traditional Korean drum and percussion show opened our ears and eyes for this beautiful and sometimes mysterious country. This closing dinner outside Busan was very special, in a kind of museum with a terracotta choir of a million voices, and…. Continue reading “5 th PATA Days in Busan, Korea, news from the meeting, field trips”

5 th PATA Days in Busan, Korea, news from the meeting

Yesterday and today is the time of the lectures and talks, after the introducing field excursion as Christoph has reported. Yesterday evening we waved goodbye to Christoph with a couple of beers, he already needed to leave for another meeting in Durham, UK, early.  We started yesterday morning with keynotes by John Suppe on folding and fold scarps and Vincent Cronin on his SLAM project (the seismo-lineament analysis method, visit his webpage for more information). Continue reading “5 th PATA Days in Busan, Korea, news from the meeting”

PATA Days in Busan, Korea, have started

The 5th PATA Days (5th International INQUA Meeting on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics and Archeoseismology) have started with a great icebreaker party on Sunday. On Monday we went on a field trip to Korea’s east coast and had a look at uplifted Late Quaternary terraces and some relatively young thrust faults. Plus, we visited a nuclear waste deposit site. Today the first presentations will start at 10 a.m. and the first poster session will be held. Here are some impressions from the first days:

Continue reading “PATA Days in Busan, Korea, have started”

Full Professor (W3) for Geodynamics in Tübingen

Here’s another job offer that will be interesting for the active tectonics and paleoseismology community. The University of Tübingen will hire a Full Professor (W3) for Geodynamics. They are looking for someone who is familiar with “geophysical methods applied to crustal dynamics or surface processes (broadly defined), preferably with application to geologic hazards. The research focus should be on the physical analysis of Earth surface, tectonic, or climate processes and can include (but is not limited to): geodesy and active tectonics, earthquake seismology and neotectonics, mechanics of hillslopes, sediment transport and erosion, crustal or paleoclimate numerical modeling, or regional to global climate change. A combination of observational and modeling techniques at the regional scale or larger is desirable.

Find the job offer here or download the pdf here: EOS_Ausschreibungstext_Geodynamic_v140828 (pdf, 57 KB). Continue reading “Full Professor (W3) for Geodynamics in Tübingen”

GEER report on the Napa earthquake online

The M6.0 Napa earthquake came along with some interesting effects. It produced relatively large surface ruptures, but only minor secondary earthquake environmental effects like localized lateral spread, almost no liquefaction and rockfalls, but some hydrological changes. Dozens of geoscientists went out for mapping the earthquake ruptures, supported by InSAR data that precisely show where the ground moved.

Now the Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance (GEER) Association published a 400-pages report on their findings. The report is available for download here. Make sure to read it, it’s full of data and great photographs of surface ruptures.

Other interesting articles and posts on the Napa quake: Continue reading “GEER report on the Napa earthquake online”

Open position: Paleoseismologist at Utah Geological Survey

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An interesting job is currently available at the Utah Geological Survey. They are looking for a project geologist (active tectonics/paleoseismology):

“This is a full-time, career service position, located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Replacing Chris DuRoss who resigned. Requisition #02264.  CLOSES: 10/06/2014. ***THIS IS A PUBLIC RECRUITMENT*** To view and/or apply for this job announcement, go to http://statejobs.utah.gov/jobseeker/, click on Job Search, then Job Listings.  If you have any questions regarding this announcement, please call the Human Resource Office at 801-538-7425.”

You can follow the Utah Geological Survey via Facebook and Twitter, and make also sure to bookmark their interesting blog.

More interesting jobs that are currently avaliable: Continue reading “Open position: Paleoseismologist at Utah Geological Survey”

5th PATA Days in Busan, Korea, will start on Sunday

It’s only a few days until the 5th PATA Days will start in Busan, Korea. This International INQUA Meeting on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics and Archeoseismology is the first one to be held in Asia, and I am really excited. The organizers have put together an amazing program. After the icebreaker party on Sunday in the New Malden Pub we will go for a pre-meeting field trip on 22 September. Heading to Korea’s east coast, we will have a look at Quaternary terraces and nuclear power plant sites. The main part of the meeting (23rd and 24th) is dedicated to more than 25 talks on Earthquake Geology, Paleoseismology, Archeoseismology, Active Tectonics, and Seismic Hazard, flanked by poster sessions. Finally, the post-meeting field trip will lead us to active faults in SE Korea and archeoseismological sites. Continue reading “5th PATA Days in Busan, Korea, will start on Sunday”

New project for inventory and mapping hazardous faults in South America launched

In 2013 the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) –www.globalquakemodel.org – published seven Requests for Proposal covering topics related to the compilation of basic datasets as well as the creation and calculation of an updated probabilistic seismic hazard input model for South America. This initiative is now named the South America Risk Assessment Project (SARA).

Five consortia of South American researchers responded to this request and submitted proposals for the Hazard Component of SARA. These proposals has been recently endorsed by GEM and will constitute different datasets or topic layers for SARA. They include databases on historical and instrumental seismicity, hazardous faults (Quaternary deformation), tectonic geodesy and ground motions. Continue reading “New project for inventory and mapping hazardous faults in South America launched”