A Mw6.9 earthquake in the Aegean Sea

Today (2014-05-24) on 09:25 UTC an earthquake with magnitude MW6.9 occurred in the NE Aegean Sea. The EMSC reports a depth of 27 km (USGS: 10 km). The quake had a (right-lateral) strike-slip mechanism and was felt as far away as Athens, Istanbul, and Sofia. More than 200 people were injured, most of them only lightly, and moderate damage to dozens of houses has been reported. The earthquake occurred on the (S)Western part of the North Anatolian Fault in the Samos Basin and was among the strongest events that have ever been recorded at that segment. Continue reading “A Mw6.9 earthquake in the Aegean Sea”

PhD position available at URI: Paleoseismology of the Cascadian Subduction Zone

The Sea Level Research laboratory in the Department of Geosciences at the University of Rhode Island is looking to recruit a PhD student to work on an NSF funded project focused on paleoseismology of the Cascadia subduction zone.
The project involves collaboration with Rutgers University, University of North Carolina Wilmington, and the United States Geological Survey. The position can start as early as September 1st 2014. Continue reading “PhD position available at URI: Paleoseismology of the Cascadian Subduction Zone”

6th INQUA International Workshop on Active Tectonics, Paleoseismology and Archeoseismology – 19-24 April 2015, Pescina, Italy

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

we are pleased to announce that the 6th  INQUA International Workshop on Active Tectonics, Paleoseismology and Archeoseismology will be held in Pescina (Abruzzo, Central Italy) in the period 19 – 24 April 2015.

We invite all scientists in the fields of earthquake geology, paleoseismology, archeoseismology, tsunami studies, earthquake engineering, seismic hazard assessment to join this event.

We will celebrate the centenary of the 1915 M7 Fucino earthquake, that has been one of the most devastating earthquakes occurred in the Apennines. The earthquake produced extensive surface faulting and left a strong imprint in the landscape giving rise to an incredibly rich seismological, geological and paleoseismological amount of studies in the last century.

Scientific sessions will be attended in the unique historical and cultural atmosphere of the Pescina village, followed by 2 days-field trip in the Fucino and L’Aquila area, retracing on the field the path of faults, landscapes, castles and ancient settlements. Moreover, a pre-congress archaeoseismic tour in Rome will be offered to all the participants.

Soon a specific website dedicated to this event will be available, where you will find more detailed and updated information, including information on the Participation, Travel Grants and Scientific Programme.

The Fucino 2015 Organizing Committee Continue reading “6th INQUA International Workshop on Active Tectonics, Paleoseismology and Archeoseismology – 19-24 April 2015, Pescina, Italy”

New project: ArMedEa – Archaeology of the Medieval Earthquakes in Europe (1000-1550 AD)

An interesting new project aims on a better understanding of ancient earthquakes in Europe. ArMedEa – Archaeology of the Medieval Earthquakes in Europe (1000-1550 AD) is dedicated to increase our knowledge of medieval seismic events. The 2-years project based at Durham University will focus on archaeological information on quakes, tsunamis and earthquake-induced mass movements. ArMedEa is run by Paolo Forlin (supervised by Chris Gerrard and Dave Petley). The project has just started and already has its own blog. Continue reading “New project: ArMedEa – Archaeology of the Medieval Earthquakes in Europe (1000-1550 AD)”

8th International Symposium on Eastern Mediterranean Geology (ISEMG), 13-17 October, 2014, Muğla, Turkey

wikipedia.de

The 8th International Symposium on Eastern Mediterranean Geology (ISEMG) will be held in Muğla from 13-17 October 2014. The symposium will take place at Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University. There are some nice sessions that deal with paleoseismology and related topics. The abstract deadline is 15 May, so if you can’t go to Busan in September, check if Turkey would be an alternative. Continue reading “8th International Symposium on Eastern Mediterranean Geology (ISEMG), 13-17 October, 2014, Muğla, Turkey”

Earthquakes induced/triggered by fracking, oil extraction, waste water disposal?

Two articles dealing with induced (or triggered?) seismicity caught my attention last week. Time came up with a report about The Seismic Link Between Fracking and Earthquakes“. New studies on that topic had been presented at the SSA annual meeting in Alaska. Basically it’s now possible to link two phenomena: a) The huge increase in shale gas and oil development in Ohio, Oklahoma, and Kansas during the last few years; and b) the huge increase in earthquake activity in Ohio, Oklahoma, and Kansas during the last few years. Continue reading “Earthquakes induced/triggered by fracking, oil extraction, waste water disposal?”

The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake caused slip on other faults in California, too!

On 4 April, 2010, the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurred in NW Baja California, Mexico. It was magnitude 7.2 strike-slip event, and the (surface) ruptures were distributed over a set of faults in the area, among them the Laguna Salada Fault. The epicentral area was under surveillance by a technique similar to DInSAR –  Uninhabited Aerial
Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). Comparison of images from before and after the M7.2 earthquake revealed that slip occurred not only in the epicentral area and at the Laguna Salada Fault, but also on faults to the north. These findings were recently published by Donnellan et al. (2014). Continue reading “The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake caused slip on other faults in California, too!”

A paleoseismicity-spy and desert geologist in Alaska

The SSA2014 annual meeting took place in Anchorage, Alaska from 29 April – 2 May. Currently the post-meeting excursion on the effects of the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 is taking place, and we placed our paleoseismicity-spy Gösta Hoffmann in the group. We hope that no one realizes that he’s a desert geologist and absolutely in the wrong place, but he promised to not wear his Teva sandals in order not be identified. Gösta is Associate Professor at the German University of Technology in Oman (GUtech) and works on coastal change and tsunamis, and particularly on tsunamis in the Arabian Sea. Here is his report from Alaska: Continue reading “A paleoseismicity-spy and desert geologist in Alaska”

Doggerland likely to have vanished due to the Storegga tsunami 8 ka ago

“Doggerland” refers to a drowned landscape located where the North Sea stretches today. Fishermen have found numerous archaeological artifacts when fishing between the coasts of UK and Denmark/Germany (more or less), which led to the idea that an ancient culture lived in this area when the sea level was lower some thousands of years ago. Archaeological studies and modelling confirmed this hypothesis (e.g., see Coles, 2000 or see this paper with a really cool title: White, 2006). Slowly rising sea levels and/or land subsidence forced our ancestors to move to higher grounds and to finally give up Doggerland at all around 8 ka ago. Jon Hill and his co-authors now added some more spice to this story. At the EGU they presented modelling data which imply that the Storegga tsunami over-ran the remaining islands, and that the end of Doggerland was sudden. Continue reading “Doggerland likely to have vanished due to the Storegga tsunami 8 ka ago”