New paper on the post-depositional changes of Tsunamites

A new paper published in Natural Hazards today discusses post-depositional changes of tsunamites. At sites in Thailand covered by sediments of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami, Szczuciński (2011) has documented significant changes in the deposits over the last seven years. Not only were the tsunamites altered, eroded or re-deposited by animals and seasonal rain, but also vanished in certain cases.

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GSA Special Paper 479 – Geological Criteria for Evaluating Seismicity Revisited: Forty Years of Paleoseismic Investigations and the Natural Record of Past Earthquakes

A new book with focus on paleoseismology has been published by GSA. Special Paper 479 – “Geological Criteria for Evaluating Seismicity Revisited: Forty Years of Paleoseismic Investigations and the Natural Record of Past Earthquakes” is edited by Franck A. Audemard M., Alessandro Maria Michetti and James P. McCalpin. Again, a lot of interesting reading stuff for your flight to Corinth…

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The Wednesday Centerfault (8) – Virginia M5.8 Earthquake

Yesterday, a magnitude 5.8 earthquake happened near Mineral, Virginia in a depth of 6 km only (37.936°N, 77.933°W) with a thrust faulting mechanism. Media report that the quake was felt as far as Boston and even Canada to the north, but significantly less far away in southern direction. The US East Coast quakes are normally felt in a wide range, since the crust there is old, cold and dense which makes it easy for the seismic waves to propagate. Some damage occurred at the epicentral area, but apparently there were no fatalities. From the earthquake effects (Chimneys collapsed, walls cracked, some springs showed changes) and instrumental measurements an epicentral intensity of VII can be determined. Continue reading “The Wednesday Centerfault (8) – Virginia M5.8 Earthquake”

Special issue on Archaeology and Paleoseismology in Quat. Int. 242

It is our greatest pleasure to announce that a new special issue on paleo- and archaeoseismology has been published. The special issue of Quaternary International mainly consists of contributions from a selection of those presented during the first International Workshop on Earthquake Archaeology and Palaeoseismology held at the ancient Roman City of Baelo Claudia (South Spain) in September 2009. There in Southern Spain, the first joint meeting of the INQUA Focus Area on Palaeoseismology and Active tectonics and the UNESCO-IUGS programme IGCP567 on Earthquake Archaeology took place. This volume is one of the first accounts of an integrated approach in the study of past earthquakes combining recent advances in palaeoseismology and earthquake archaeology.

There’s a lot of great reading stuff or the summer holidays or on the plane to Corinth… Continue reading “Special issue on Archaeology and Paleoseismology in Quat. Int. 242”

Where on GoogleEarth? WoGE #306 (Updated)

Matthew’s WoGE #305 showed one of the rare sandstone outcrops in Georgia, the Broxton Rocks. The best hint was in the image source: “USDA Farm Service Agency” led me to search the US, and from the vegetation and the shape of the fields (and the E-W river!) it didn’t take too long to find it. But he was right – finding out about the geology wasn’t that easy.

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Reprise of the XVIII INQUA meeting in Berne, Switzerland, 2011

Dear friends, colleagues, and followers,

last week the XVIII INQUA Congress took place in Berne (Switzerland). The session “Paleoseismology, megacities and critical social infrastructures” that was held on Wednesday 27 July 2011 (8.30 – 12.30), and, later the Business Meeting of the INQUA TERPRO Focus Area on Paleoseismicity and Active Tectonics took place. We had a very impressive session with important contributions of our Japanese colleagues, suffering not only earthquake and tsunami damage, but also from critical facilities.
Besides our nice presentations and discussions, it should be announced here that Prof. Alessandro Maria Michetti (Como, Italy) was elected INQUA TERPRO president. Congratulations from paleoseismicity.org. And thank you, Ale, for keeping us running. Continue reading “Reprise of the XVIII INQUA meeting in Berne, Switzerland, 2011”